Wednesday, November 23, 2005

fishing and giving thanks

Home computer is down, and I'm waiting for Intercontinental Ballistic Virus Missiles to repair the mess.

Please understand that "the farmers wife" is truly lo-tech....sometimes operating off of a generator. Out here is sometimes like a third world country, if a black cloud passes over we have no power! And "the farmers wife" is old and not computer savvy, lucky I know how to log on. As you can see there are no links to the right of my blog because the truth is I've never figured out how to do that.

But, if you like images and words from the heartland, and a peek into a simpler, gentler lifestyle - stick around. As soon as the troops blast the gremlins out ... I'll be back.

Taking lots of photos and hope to post some soon.

Happy Thanksgiving to all.

11 comments:

Floridacracker said...

It's always worth the wait at the farmer's wife.
Happy Thanksgiving!

abe/happy said...

we love your photos ~ the wait makes it all the more worthwhile.

Have a great Turkey Day! :)

Kobus said...

Farmer's Wife,

I'm a visitor from the Southern tip of the continent of Africa. Over the last two weeks or so, I have read with pleasure through most of your photos and descriptions, and I now have a deeper insight into what the heartland of the US looks like. The perception I have formed is about the clash of the old world and the much touted 'new economy'. I'm so glad that what I see is not (yet!) only about the new things, but that there is a deep appreciation of herritage!

Reminds me of some of the vacations I had as a child on my Grandparents' farm in the central parts of our country. Only there, the barns and buildings are not from wood, but from sandstone... some beautifully dressed and with real craftmanship at a level that you do not find commonly anymore. I still love to drive through some of those older towns, just to see the old buildings. Pity that many of these towns have become virtual ghost towns, the farming long since destroyed by the inability of the farmers to compete with first world governments... yes, those lovely subsidies enjoyed by many agricultural communities in the US and Europe with which we cannot compete...

But that is another and different story, and one, I'm sure, with many more complexities than my current simple understanding of it allows. And it should not in the least detract from the enjoyment we get from seeing life so vividly portrayed in these pages of your blog. Please keep up the work - your site is a pleasure to behold!

Ron said...

When you return I will give you the gift of a Giant Brandy Snifter.

srp said...

We are breathlessly waiting for your new pictures. Happy Thanksgiving.

Anonymous said...

Happy Thanksgiving! I hope those missles arrive soon. I "stop by" every work day.

www.evan7.com

Anonymous said...

I was visiting my uncle yesterday and I took a picture that captures something related to your posts, though the photo itself is not as beautiful. My Uncle Red's old Ford tractor, at least 50 years old, is still in use doing the work it was built for.

-- John

Rachel said...

Be glad when they get you fixed back up, er - your computer I mean!

We'll be waiting.......and Ron is going to give you a giant brandy snifter! Wow!

merlinprincesse said...

Good luck with the PC. But I love your texts too ya know!

Lori said...

My father was a farmer and my sister is now married to one. I live in the country and can relate to that cloud passing over thing! (I also haven't figured out how to link things...not as computer literate as I'd like to be!)

I love your photographs and can so relate as we are in the midst of wheat country here in KS. Am anxious for your return!

A happy belated Thanksgiving!

Marty52 said...

I visit every day I'm at work also. I, too, grew up on a farm, and would have loved to stay there. Alas, it didn't happen that way, but coming to your blog allows me a glimpse of that way of life thru your wondrous photographs. Come back soon!