Friday, January 27, 2006

organization



This photograph was taken a short while ago. The inside of the corn crib is no longer accessible, filled with debris from it's own destruction. Crews are systematically demolishing the farm buildings to make way for a new subdivision.

I spent quite a bit of time at this property, recording some of the more interesting features, including a typical ribstone silo.

This system was employed by the farmer in an attempt to keep his tools organized and to alert him if he'd unknowingly left one laying around as he worked. The box is hand constructed and the shape of each tool has been carefully hand painted on the back board. Small nails were driven into the wood and allowed the farmer to hange each tool in it's predetermined spot.

This corn crib also had a chair sitting next to the conveyor system that served to lift and deposit the corn into the crib. Even though the farm had long since been abandoned the chair made it feel as if the farmer might return to work any moment.

8 comments:

srp said...

My dad has a peg board in the garage just like this. Maybe it's a throwback to his early days on the farm in Southern Illinois.

pablo said...

My father-in-law (born in Illinois) did this same thing for his tools. With a wife and four children always needing one of my tools, such an idea would never have had much tractions.

Melissa said...

Clever idea. It is sad to see farms disappearing to subdivisions. I'm glad you are capturing the old stories on camera. What type of equipment do you use?

Floridacracker said...

Zanne,
When is your coffee table book of rural middle America coming out? These are wonderful pics.

Zanne said...

Thanks all for the comments. Pablo - the husband complains bitterly when his tools have gone missing.

Cracker - thanks for the idea. I could probably self-publish. You do have a coffee table, don't you?

Melissa- welcome to the Farmers Wife, I'm so glad you are here. I use both a Nikon D70 (the big guns), but the majority of the pics are from the Fuji S5000. It's a very good camera and unfortunately in the country it's very dangerous to pull over on narrow roads. Alot of the landscape shots are quick grabs.

Tim Rice said...

Zanne, thanks for preserving a bit of the past via this picture here. Its simple utility has its own beauty.

mark said...

What a beautiful photo!

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